Bulldogs Boys Soccer Teams Dominate Wildcats

first_imgThe Batesville Bulldogs Boys Soccer Teams defeated The  Franklin County Wildcats in Varsity and JV action at Brookville.JV.  Record: 2-0 (EIAC 2-0)BHS. 8,  Franklin County 0Varsity.  Record: 3-0 (EIAC 2-0)BHS. 10,  Franklin County 0Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Chris Fox.last_img

South Sound Women’s Boating Seminar Sails into Olympia on May 20

first_imgFacebook9Tweet0Pin0Submitted by the Olympia Yacht ClubTickets are still available for the South Sound Women’s Boating Seminar held on Saturday, May 20th at the Olympia Yacht ClubThe theme this year is ‘Chart Your Own Course.’  Presentations by experienced women captains will include:Presentations will be given by women boaters for women boaters. Photo courtesy: Olympia Yacht ClubBlow Ye Winds Hi Ho: Understanding Weather on the Water with Capt. Karen SullivanFinding Yourself on the Water: Navigation Essentials with Capt. Mary CampbellDocking Your Boat with Capt. Ace SpraggKeeping the Lights On: Boat 12V Systems with Capt. Allison Mazon Panel discussion of Favorite Cruising Locations Our ever popular Hands-On Fair is expanded to a full day and offers opportunities to explore charting, boat circuitry, galley provisioning, knot tying, canvas repair and more.The seminar welcomes power boaters as well as sailors. The novice can build a solid foundation, while more experienced boaters can deepen their knowledge and strengthen essential skills. Past participants report that they gained critical information and techniques to feel safer and more confident on the water.Photo courtesy: Olympia Yacht ClubWe’re also proud to support the next generation of women boaters through a raffle to fund scholarships for “Girls at the Helm” aboard the historic schooner Adventuress. Raffle prizes include baskets of boating gear, professional survey and maintenance services, and captain’s license instruction.Register now for the seminar at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2803493 – “South Sound Women’s Boating Seminar.” Early registration is $45 by April 30, $50 after April 30.  Includes parking and a sumptuous lunch.Questions? Contact [email protected]last_img read more

Nelson’s Dryden Hunt traded to Moose Jaw Warriors

first_imgDuring the summer, Nelson Minor Hockey grad Dryden Hunt was unsure where he’d be playing this Western Hockey League season. Wednesday, the 6-foot, 200-pound sniper found a home when the Moose Jaw Warriors of the acquired the 20-year-old Nelsonite from the Medicine Hat Tigers in exchange for a 2nd round pick in 2016 and a 3rd round pick in 2018. Moose Jaw finished out of the playoffs last season, ninth in the Eastern Conference behind Swift Current. Last season Hunt finished 13th in the WHL in scoring last season with 33 goals, 50 assists, and 83 points in 71 games.  Hunt has played 197 WHL regular games with Medicine Hat and Regina, he has 59 goals, 74 assists, 133 points, and 142 penalty minutes.  In the 2015 WHL Playoffs, he had five goals and seven points in ten games, in 17 career post-season games he has nine goals and 12 points.  Hunt recently attended the Montreal Canadiens training camp. Hunt is expected to make his Warriors debut Thursday when they open the 2015-2016 regular season at Mosaic Place against the Regina Pats in what is a “stand-alone” feature game to kick-off the WHL’s 50th Season. —With files from Moose Jaw Warriors The story originated at The Nelson Daily.last_img read more

What we learned about the Raiders at the combine

first_imgINDIANAPOLIS — The Raiders never fail to stay relevant, regardless of their standing in the NFL hierarchy, and this week at the combine was no different.From Antonio Brown rumors to owning the most first-round picks in the league, the Raiders have plenty circulating this time of the offseason.With free agency less than two weeks away and the draft less than two months in the distance, here are five things we learned about Jon Gruden’s team in Indianapolis entering his second year back at the …last_img

Google Solves the Fafebook Problem

first_imgMillions of people around the world don’t know what a browser is, they don’t know the difference between a search bar and an address bar and they sure don’t follow the finer points of Google’s many little changes it makes to their search results. They go to the Google and they type in Facebook login. Then they click on the links that show up, sometimes with very humorous results.Google today introduced a new feature that will let mainstream users get search results to hold still and remain where they expect them to be. It’s called Stars and it’s essentially pinning a link permanently to the top of a search results page for a certain query. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Above: Probably not how this feature will generally be used.When one of our blog posts showed up high in a Google search last month for “Facebook login” we saw hundreds of thousands of confused people stream into our site and post typo-ridden comments like “I WANT MY FAFEBOOK!” Many of them couldn’t tell that they were visiting a blog post about Facebook, and with Facebook Connect login, and not Facebook.com itself. Even though we said as much in big bold letters after the first few thousand of them. Thousands more people visited the site to gawk at those users and their comments. A common response was for web designers to say “we must not be serving mainstream users very well if they are confused in a situation like this.”Enter features like Google Stars. It’s a great idea. No dumbing-down the internet for those lucky relative few of us who do know how to use it, just some additional options for those who are still beginning to learn. Expect to see more developments like this as regular web use becomes a more common experience for non technical people. This may be an example of a best-case solution.Update: Several people in comments have said they don’t think Stars are going to work for mainstream users, either. What do you think? Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts Tags:#Google#news#Real World#web 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… marshall kirkpatricklast_img read more

10 months agoBournemouth boss Howe: No transfer decisions set in stone

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Bournemouth boss Howe: No transfer decisions set in stoneby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBournemouth boss Eddie Howe admits he needs to consider where his squad needs to be strengthened ahead of the market opening next month.Simon Francis is out for the season with a knee injury.Asked whether his captain’s setback would impact on his thinking ahead of the upcoming transfer window, Howe replied: “I’d be lying if I said it hasn’t and I have had those conversations but we will wait and see what happens.“Nothing has been decided we have made no moves in the market at all at the moment. I think it’s a case of still seeing what options we have available to us.“It would be foolish of me to make that promise and pledge but we are looking at what we can do.” last_img read more

Proposed changes on Medicare drugs but would costs go down

first_imgWASHINGTON — The Trump administration is proposing changes to Medicare’s prescription drug benefit that would affect people’s costs over the next few years.Officials say their goal is to lower costs and modernize Medicare, the government health insurance program that covers about 60 million seniors and disabled people. Some proposals could create winners and losers among seniors, insurers, middlemen and drugmakers.The changes include more leeway for insurers to exclude a specific drug in Medicare’s six “protected classes” of medications. Also, use of e-prescribing would grow.And insurers could require “step therapy” for drugs given in a doctor’s office, which means patients first have to try a lower-cost drug.The administration also wants changes to Medicare rules so rebates from drugmakers get passed on to beneficiaries at the pharmacy.Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Sisodia trying to violate MCC RP Singh to Delhi CEO

first_imgNew Delhi: BJP National Secretary RP Singh on Thursday registered a complaint with the Chief Electoral Officer in Delhi, in connection with a Parent-Teacher Meeting called by Deputy Chief Minister Manish Sisodia, saying that the meeting is being held to publicise the Aam Aadmi Party under false pretexts. The meeting has been scheduled for April 20 in a government school run by the Delhi government. Singh said, “The Deputy CM of Delhi is going to misuse this PTM for the publicity of AAP with the help of a committee on the pretext of a meeting with the parents of children studying in Government schools.” Singh said that Sisodia is trying to influence the 2019 Lok Sabha polls by holding this meeting at the cost of the public exchequer and also claimed that it is a violation of the Model Code of Conduct. The BJP leader said that while the meeting has been called to suggest ways to improve students’ ability to learn and make the education system better, most of the team that is to meet the parents are party workers.last_img read more

Whats Behind MLBs Bizarre Spike In Contract Extensions

While veteran stars including Nolan Arenado, Chris Sale and Mike Trout all signed massive extensions this spring, players with little major league experience made up the majority of the deals. Fourteen of the players — including reigning NL Rookie of the Year Ronald Acuna, who signed a $100 million extension last week, and fellow Brave Ozzie Albies, who signed a much-discussed extension Thursday — were so early in their careers that they were not yet eligible for salary arbitration, which generally requires a player to accrue three years of major league experience before becoming eligible to negotiate for significant raises. Eight others were at least a year shy of six years of service time, the amount required to become a free agent. In 2019 to date, players signing extensions have forfeited 51 combined arbitration-eligible seasons and 69 future free-agent years. The deals also include club options covering 25 seasons.Buying out the arbitration and free agency years of younger stars for the purpose of controlling and reducing payroll costs was a practice pioneered in the early 1990s by John Hart, then general manager of the Cleveland Indians, who watched great Pittsburgh Pirates teams broken up prematurely because of escalating player costs. While extensions had since become common practice, the activity had slowed in recent seasons as young stars like Bryce Harper and Manny Machado seemed intent on hitting the open market as soon as possible.So what’s behind the extension surge this spring? Why are MLB teams intent on avoiding arbitration and locking up young stars? It may be because arbitration wasn’t working to begin with — at least from the perspective of the teams.Under arbitration, a player and a team each puts forth a salary amount to a panel of arbitrators, who then must decide on one of the two figures. In the past two offseasons, players have totaled more wins than losses in arbitration cases against the owners — the first time that’s happened in back-to-back years since 1989-90. Through 2015, owners had won 58 percent of all arbitration cases, according to Forbes.This winter, Gerrit Cole ($13.5 million) and Trevor Bauer ($13 million) were among the six players to win their cases against their clubs. Arenado and the Rockies avoided a hearing, which is common practice, by signing a one-year, $26 million deal — a record for a player eligible for arbitration.“We’re going to be seeing $20 [million] and $30 million salaries regularly in arbitration,” one agent told us. “They [MLB teams] are going to try and push back on that. How do you do it? You pull those guys out of the system.“Every time the teams see a seam in the defense, they exploit the shit out of it and they are really good at it,” the agent said. “They are capitalizing on good players they have been watching through the draft, through the minor leagues, and who are represented largely by unqualified or under-qualified agents. The teams have scouting reports on agents the very same way they have on opposing hitters and pitchers. They have heat maps. They know our tendencies, they know who will go to arbitration, who won’t, whose business is failing and they need to vest their fees.”The agent noted that teams look at arbitration as an important battleground and have scores of analysts that compile data for these cases. By taking players out of the arbitration system, the teams not only cap earning potential for those players, but they also reduce salary comps for other players. Agent Scott Boras described the MLB’s aggressive approach with young players and extensions this spring as “snuff contracts” — or an attempt to snuff out future markets.Greg Dreyfuss, an associate general counsel for the union and the MLBPA’s director of analytics and baseball operations, also sees a link between the wave of extensions and players’ recent arbitration wins. The union and players have closed the data gap between clubs in making their cases. Dreyfuss says agents and players are educated on the market. While MLB payrolls remain stagnant, the records for largest arbitration salaries have been set in the past two years. The average salary of an arbitration-eligible player in 2011 was $2.73 million; that increased to $3.97 million this year, a 45 percent jump, according to analysis of MLBTradeRumors.com data.The total dollars and players in the arbitration system has jumped from $393.6 million and 144 players in 2011 to $789.6 million spread among 199 players this last offseason, growth in part due to the game trending younger — meaning that there will be more 20-somethings entering arbitration.“Nine of the 10 largest one-year contracts in the history of salary arbitration have come in the past two years, and overall, arbitration salaries have kept pace with the rise in industry revenue over a 10-year period,” Dreyfuss told FiveThirtyEight. “Recently a lot of really good players in that process have stood up and said, ‘No, I’m not just going to take what you give me,’ and they’ve fought for what they consider a fair salary. So, I do think there’s some correlation between players succeeding in arbitration and clubs wanting to take players out of that process.”While spending efficiently is always a goal for teams, how these clubs have handled free agency in recent winters may be a motivating factor in some players’ decision-making. Even Trout, the game’s best player, expressed reservations about entering the open market when he signed a record extension (which is also a bargain for the Angels) this spring.“I kind of saw what Bryce and Manny went through and it drew a red flag for me,” Trout said. “I talked to Manny and Bryce. It was a tough couple months in the offseason. They put it perspective in my mind.”Not all extensions are club-friendly. Drefyuss notes that there have also been a number of veteran players who have agreed to extensions that will pay them lucratively into their mid-30s.“Players agree to extensions for a variety of valid reasons, and there are any number of factors involved in their decisions,” he saidOne key decision a player must make when considering an extension is how much financial upside to concede for the sake of job and financial security. In dealing with future risk, teams face less downside than individual players do. While a team can absorb a poor contract, a player is one injury or decline in performance away from having his career trajectory significantly altered.Acuna and Albies look like future superstars, yet they signed deals that could potentially cost them nine figures in future earnings. White Sox top prospect Eloy Jimenez signed a six-year deal with two club options before he ever took a major league at-bat, limiting his financial upside. Those are the types of club-friendly deals that some on the players’ side have criticized. There is also an argument that individual players ought to consider not just themselves but their peers and future major leaguers when considering a long-term deal — and that they should wait until they are at least arbitration-eligible.“If guys aren’t going through the system, if all the young [stars] are signing before they get there, then we are not going to have those posts to hold on to,” the agent said of salary comps. “I don’t think this is teams trying to screw with the free agent market. They are trying to take the best young players out of the arbitration system.”Toronto outfielder Randal Grichuk, 27, said the Blue Jays began negotiating with him last month during spring training in the midst of the extension spree. He eventually signed a five-year, $52 million extension.“The way I looked at it was taking guaranteed money, setting my family up for life, it’s hard to turn down,” Grichuk said. “If I leave a few dollars on the table now, I’m going to just be finishing my 31 season [after his deal expires] going into free agency. If I produce well, I’m going to be young enough to make some more. And if I’m not able to, whether due to injuries, failures, anything happens, I’m still set for life.”Grichuk was into his arbitration years when he signed his extension, but he didn’t take issue with young stars like Acuna opting for financial security earlier along in the process.“He could have probably waited and got more, but it’s tough to talk negatively about a guy who just got $100 million and is set for life,” Grichuk said. “What’s the difference between $100 [million] and $200 [million]? His kids’ kids’ kids won’t have to work? … I think it’s one of those things where his life changes completely.”Neil Paine contributed researchCheck out our latest MLB predictions. On Feb. 13, 25-year-old ace Aaron Nola agreed to a four-year contract extension with the Phillies. A day later, 26-year-old Max Kepler and 25-year-old Jorge Polanco agreed to five-year extensions with the Twins. The following day, Yankees ace Luis Severino, who turned 25 a few days later, signed a pact with the Yankees. The deals marked the beginning of a historic spree of extensions.From mid-February through Thursday, 27 players had agreed to extensions worth a total of 132 years and $2.045 billion, according to data from the MLBTradeRumors.com extension database analyzed by FiveThirtyEight. There has never been a flurry of activity like this: March represented the most dollars ($1.126 billion) and years (58) awarded in contract extensions in a one-month period that we’ve seen. read more

Ohio States Stoneburner Mewhort released from football scholarships

Ohio State redshirt senior tight end Jake Stoneburner and redshirt junior offensive lineman Jack Mewhort have been removed from their athletic scholarships-at least until the end of the summer. In a statement released Friday night from Urban Meyer via an OSU department of athletics spokesperson, the two football players “will each be removed from athletic scholarship beginning with the summer term, and they will continue to be suspended from team activities until stipulations are successfully met.” “We are disappointed with the decisions made recently by two of our football players,” the release said. “(Stoneburner and Mewhort) will have an opportunity to return to the team in good standing following the summer session.” The decision comes nearly two weeks after Stoneburner and Mewhort were suspended June 3 after being arrested for obstructing justice. According to a police report from the Shawnee Hills Police Department, police said they spotted Stoneburner, Mewhort and a third person, Austin Barnard, urinating on what appeared to be an early childhood education school called The Oxford School near the Bogey Inn in Dublin, Ohio. After shining a bright light, police said the three suspects ran away. Police said they found Stoneburner and Barnard crouched between cars while Mewhort fled to a nearby wooded area before turning himself in after threatening to use a police dog. Stoneburner and Mewhort were expected to be starters for the upcoming season. In 2011, Stoneburner caught 14 passes for 193 yards and had seven touchdown catches. Stoneburner was recruited out of Dublin Coffman High School. He has caught 37 passes in his career at OSU. Meyer listed Stoneburner after this year’s Spring Game on April 21 as one of his “top offensive playmakers.” Mewhort was a highly recruited prospect out of St. John’s Jesuit High School and Academy in Toledo, Ohio. read more