NBA player Faried rues lack of facilities in India

first_imgMumbai, May 23 (PTI) Denver Nuggets National Basketball Association (NBA) player Kenneth Faried has expressed displeasure over lack of facilities for growth of the hoop game in India.”But they dont have the facilities in India as far as that we have in the US (United States). We have courts all over the place, in India, (there is) cricket all over the place, so cricket is going to be seen on TV more,” Faried told a select group of reporters here.The 27-year-old player said that NBAs “goal” was to make basketball the number two sport in the country.Faried, with the nickname “Manimal”, was on a visit to India to engage with the youth and trainers in the cities and grow the game of basketball via NBAs initiatives in India ? NBA Zone and ?Around the hoop on SONY SIX TV channel.He visited the Jamnabai school in suburban Juhu, which is the first ever basketball school and from where talented students can be recommended to the NBA academy recently opened in the National Capital Region.International coaches give training to the students from the school.Asked about the visit, Faried said, “The school is going to help kids learn basketball. You must know the fundamentals of the game and the school will help the kids develop their technique.”He also expressed disappointment over the fact that India does not have a structure, like US or in other countries, from where professionals are selected from the college level. PTI NRB SSR DK PTPadvertisementlast_img read more

Scheer says he will not reopen abortion debate as members vote to

first_imgHALIFAX – Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer reiterated his pledge not to reopen the abortion debate, hours before party members voted to uphold the existing policy at the Tories’ national convention in Halifax on Saturday.One of 74 resolutions debated at the convention on Friday proposed removing any reference to regulating abortion from the party’s official policy, but the resolution was narrowly defeated on Saturday.The party policy currently says a Conservative government would not support any legislation to regulate abortion, and Saturday’s vote of 53 per cent to 47 per cent means that policy will stand.In an interview with The Canadian Press earlier in the day, Scheer said he would not bring in any legislation to reopen divisive issues such as abortion, even if a majority of members had voted in favour of the resolution.“I’ve made it very clear that, as prime minister, I will not reopen that debate. I will not introduce legislation to reopen divisive issues or to reopen issues that have already been settled by previous governments,” he said.During the policy plenary on the closing day of the convention on Saturday, several contentious resolutions were voted on by the general membership, including two other resolutions that deal with abortion — both of which passed.One says abortion should be explicitly excluded from maternal child and health financial aid that Canada provides to developing countries. That resolution passed easily, so an electronic vote count was not needed.Another resolution supporting legislation to ensure any child born alive should be given every opportunity to sustain life also passed with a margin of 63 per cent to 37 per cent. That resolution was supported by the anti-abortion lobby group the Campaign Life Coalition.Before the votes were even held, however, Scheer said that while he welcomes open debates and discussions among the members, he will remain “unequivocal” in his stance that he will not entertain divisive social issues, including abortion.But abortion wasn’t the only controversial social issue raised in the policy resolutions, each of which were put forward by electoral riding associations from across the country.Another resolution, which opposed the extension of “euthanasia and assisted suicide” to minors, people with mental illness or “people who are not competent,” passed by a margin of 62 per cent to 38 per cent.Another, which described pornography as a public health risk in need of government regulation to reduce exposure and addiction, was defeated.The debates elicited many heated arguments about the Conservative party’s ideology and ability to accommodate the views and policy proposals of more socially conservative members within the party.On Friday, some delegates even passed out handouts dictating how “Conservatives for real Conservative values” should vote on the more controversial social issue resolutions.For those who aren’t happy with the outcome of some of Saturday’s votes and feel disenfranchised, Scheer said he would like to try to work on areas where they can find consensus.“A leader’s job is to find common ground,” he said.“I’m not going to bring in legislation, bring in proposals that would divide our own caucus, divide our own party and divide Canadians.”Follow @ReporterTeresa on Twitter.last_img read more