‘Keita & Lallana not up to the job for a title-winning team’

first_imgLiverpool must avoid playing Naby Keita and Adam Lallana in the same midfield, says John Aldridge, with the pair having shown that they are “not up to the job for a title-winning team”.Jurgen Klopp shuffled his pack on Monday night for the trip to West Ham in the Premier League.AdChoices广告He saw his side take the lead at the London Stadium through Sadio Mane, but Michail Antonio restored parity in another 1-1 draw for the Reds. Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘There is no creativity’ – Can Solskjaer get Man Utd scoring freely again? ‘Everyone legged it on to the pitch!’ – How Foden went from Man City superfan to future superstar Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? That result opened the door to Manchester City, with Pep Guardiola’s side moving to the top of the Premier League table on Wednesday with a 2-0 victory over Everton.Liverpool must now plot a response and a former frontman has urged them to favour other options in midfield after seeing two inconsistent performers fluff their lines on their latest audition.Aldridge told the Irish Independent: “Klopp’s side dropped more points at West Ham, but a bigger issue for me in both games has been the performance or lack of it from Liverpool’s midfielders.“[Mohamed] Salah, Mane and [Roberto] Firmino will give you a cutting edge if the balance of the team is right, but the players sitting behind them at West Ham failed to produce the goods and it cost Liverpool.“I know Klopp was forced into changes due to injuries, but Adam Lallana and Naby Keita cannot play together in midfield again, as they are just not up to the job for a title-winning team.“My first impressions of Lallana when he came to Liverpool were not positive and while he proved me wrong to an extent with some good performances before his recent injury problems, it looks like he is struggling to get back to those levels once again after so long in the treatment room.“As for Keita, he has not settled at Liverpool and has failed to deliver the performances we were expecting from him, with Klopp and his coaching staff fighting to get him up to speed and still waiting to see if he will be good enough to play in this team.”Lallana has been ravaged by fitness issues in recent times, with a string of injury problems restricting him to 15 appearances last season and 11 in the current campaign.Keita has been handed 23 outings across all competitions, but has made only 11 Premier League starts and is yet to justify the £52.75 million ($68m) transfer fee that was required to secure his services from RB Leipzig. Subscribe to Goal’s Liverpool Correspondent Neil Jones’ weekly email bringing you the best Liverpool FC writing from around the weblast_img read more

Low gas prices scuttle Synfuels carbon capture deal with Alberta government

EDMONTON — Another company has pulled the plug on one of the Alberta government’s high-profile projects to capture and store carbon created by the energy industry.Swan Hills Synfuels and the province announced Monday that they will discontinue a $285-million funding agreement that would have seen underground coal converted to gas and then burned to generate electricity. The carbon dioxide would have been stripped out and sold to nearby oilfields to boost production.Natural gas prices are too low for the plan to make economic sense at this time, said Synfuels CEO Martin Lambert.“At present, it’s more economical to purchase natural gas than it is to manufacture synthetic gas,” he said. “It’s a market reality that has led to significant delays on the CCS side of the project.”Waiting until natural gas prices go up enough to make the project viable would push the project’s timelines beyond the funding agreement, he added.Lambert said when the project was announced that natural gas needed to be above $5 a gigajoule for the plan to work. Current prices have fluctuated around the $3 mark.The Synfuels project would have sequestered about 1.3 million tonnes of carbon dioxide every year starting in 2015 by injecting it into oil wells. The operation was expected to generate between 80 million and 100 million barrels of oil that wouldn’t have otherwise been recovered.It’s not immediately clear how the Synfuels pullout will affect the province’s greenhouse gas projections.Energy Minister Ken Hughes said Synfuels had not received any payments under the original deal. No decisions on reallocating the money have been made.Synfuels was one of four carbon capture and storage projects the provincial government was funding out of a $2-billion pot. Those projects have been a major part of government responses to criticism of the province’s environmental record.Two of them remain on the books.Enhance Energy’s $600-million plan to transport CO2 from refineries in Redwater, Alta., to aging oilfields near Clive through the Alberta carbon trunk pipeline is expected to begin later this year.As well, Royal Dutch Shell is moving ahead with plans to capture one million tonnes of CO2 annually from its Scotford oil sands upgrader northeast of Edmonton. The gas is to be injected deep into a porous rock formation about 80 kilometres away to prevent it from entering the atmosphere and contributing to climate change.The Alberta and federal governments are kicking in a collective $865-million toward that project, which is expected to start in 2015.Hughes said the two projects will eventually remove 2.76 million tonnes of carbon a year. However, TransAlta backed out of a $1.4-billion carbon capture deal last spring.CEO Dawn Farrell said the costs of injecting CO2 into old oil wells to enhance production was no longer competitive with other methods of doing the same thing.Originally, the province had hoped to have five or six working projects by 2015 that would inject up to 10 million tonnes of CO2 a year into the ground.Even if that had come to pass, it wouldn’t have reduced Alberta’s overall greenhouse gas emissions, which are expected to keep climbing until 2020. read more

Vegans strike deal with abattoir to give cows last rites before they

Vegan activists have struck a deal with an abattoir to allow them to stage ‘last rites’ ceremonies with incoming cows to tell them, “we love you, we are sorry”.Leicestershire Animal Save are hosting roadside monthly vigils once a month in Melton Mowbray in which they whisper phrases to cattle before they arrive at an abattoir run by Foyle Food Group.The activists, who have held 35 ceremonies since founding their group in 2015, also hold signs which say “your taste=their death”.Group founder Dina Aherne said the group has an understanding with the slaughterhouse bosses, who let them stop the trucks and trailers which transport the cows.The 38-year-old former solicitor from Leicester said: “We want to make the cows feel at ease every time because they are living and sacred beings. Leicestershire Animal Save gather around trucks filled with cattle, praying to the cows before they enter a Foyle Food Group processing plant in Melton Mowbray “We whisper phrases to them like ‘we’re sorry’, ‘we see you’ and ‘I love you’.Ms Aherne said she believed the peaceful protests are the best way to spread the message about veganism and animal welfare.She added: “Any social movements have different kinds of action and a lot of vegan groups resort to violence.”But we condone this and the best way is to peacefully spread the message.Foyle Food Group has nine sites across the UK where they slaughter and debone more than 7,500 cattle each week across its processing plants.The company were approached to comment. “Cows have a living soul and conscience. We really want to help comfort them.”We have to arrange and give two weeks notice for when we are going to be on site.”When we arrive usually at about 8am, we gather outside the slaughterhouse on days when the abattoir is operational for about three hours.”We then stop each of the trucks and are given two minutes to say the last goodbye’s before they go and get a bolt gun put through their head. Leicestershire Animal Save gather around trucks filled with cattle, praying to the cows before they enter a Foyle Food Group processing plant in Melton MowbrayCredit:Ash Sudra Photography/SWNS Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more